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To limit the spread of coronavirus all Church of England church buildings are closed until further notice.

Our latest online services are available below. To receive notifications when new videos are available, please subscribe to our YouTube channel.

A Message from the Dean

 

Visit Porchlight and Canterbury Food Bank to get involved or to discover the help and support available.

We pray today for all those suffering from COVID-19, and especially today in this time of increased pressure, for all those working in our health services:

Healing God,
whose Son Jesus brought wholeness to lives through the power of his love,
pour out, we pray, your power to heal upon all those who work in medicine,
that through your mercy,
we may see in our own day
the injured returned to health,
the distressed led to happiness,
and the broken restored to wholeness,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The Lord bless us and keep us, the Lord make his face to shine upon us and be gracious to us, the Lord lift up the light of his countenance upon us and give us peace. Amen.

Press play to hear a performance from our Cathedral Choir.

The miracle is that this Cathedral was built by ordinary men and women like ourselves. It is our responsibility to hand that inheritance into the future.

Victor De Waal, Dean of Canterbury (1977)

The coronavirus crisis means that we need your support more than ever. The Cathedral is one of the world’s Holy Places, a special site of unique significance where worship and pilgrimage has been part of daily life for over 1,400 years.

Canterbury Cathedral does not receive any funding from the Church, the Crown, or the Government. During this time, we have no income from visitors, our Shop, nor the Cathedral Lodge hotel and conference centre. Even when UK lockdown ends, the financial pressures on the Cathedral are likely to persist for some time.

Please help us to secure the future of the Cathedral during the Covid-19 pandemic and beyond by donating to support our ministry and our stewardship of this truly special place.

Online Services

Morning Prayer by 10.00 each day
Evening Prayer by 17.30 each day
Eucharist (Sundays & Feast Days) 12.00 noon
Sunday Compline by 20.00

 

To receive notifications when new videos are available, please subscribe to our YouTube channel.
If you would like to watch recordings of our online services and reflections for Holy Week and Easter, including daily Stations of the Cross, see Holy Week and Easter 2020.

Other videos by our clergy

The Cathedral’s clergy have also created a range of other online content including a 5-part video series on the 14th-century English anchoress and mystic Julian of Norwich, and the Dean of Canterbury’s readings of classic tales Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes by Robert Louis Stevenson, and The Voyage of Saint Brendan, Journey to the Promised Land, one of the most famous and enduring stories of Western Christendom.



Morning Prayer

Evening Prayer

Eucharist (Sundays & Feast Days)

Sunday Compline


Bell ‘Harry’ tolls in remembrance of global coronavirus victims and in celebration of frontline staff

From 9th April 2020, the Cathedral’s bell ‘Harry’ will toll at 20.00 each evening in remembrance of the day’s global victims of coronavirus, and in celebration of the heroism of frontline healthcare staff and other essential workers around the world.

 

The following 9-minute recording is more meditative and includes evening birdsong. Alongside the tolling of Bell Harry, the applause for frontline UK healthcare workers is clearly audible.


Julian of Norwich: a medieval take on lockdown and how to survive it

A short video series by Canon Missioner, The Revd Dr Emma Pennington

In this 5-part video series on the 14th-century English anchoress and mystic, Rev’d Dr Emma Pennington, who holds a doctorate in Julian of Norwich from Oxford University, reflects on the relevance of Julian and her writings for us today.

Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes

A reading by the Dean of Canterbury

Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes is Robert Louis Stevenson’s story of his “pilgrimage”, made alone, with Modestine the donkey he bought to carry his luggage for the twelve day walk across valleys and mountains in the South of France in 1878. Listen to the Dean’s reading

The Voyage of Saint Brendan

A reading by the Dean of Canterbury

The Voyage of Saint Brendan, Journey to the Promised Land is the wonderful tale (from the translation by John J O’Meara), of one of the most famous and enduring stories of Western Christendom, the Navigatio Sancti Brendani Abbatis, written in Ireland perhaps as early as the year 800. While the routes of Saint Brendan’s journeys remain a subject of controversy, the tale itself is of great interest – a strongly integrated text which derives from several centuries of Irish literary tradition. Listen to the Dean’s reading

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